Libraries Working From Home #LibrariesWFH

At this point, your library should be closed. The American Library Association, The Association of College and Research Libraries, and the Association of Rural and Small Libraries have all issued statements. Staff should not be required to report to work to get paid.  All of us should be getting paid.

Some of us are working from home. This morning Rachel Walden suggested to me that this would be a good time to bring back The Library Day in the Life Project. It seems some people are questioning what library staff could possibly be doing if they are not in the library.

photo of a children's drawing of a lady bug with the words "I 'heart' you book librarian"

I waffled on this because I don’t want to contribute to anxiety about being productive or inclinations to micromanage time. While there is plenty of research that people who work remotely are more productive and healthier, we are not working from home. We are at home, during a crisis, trying to work. 

In the end, I agree with Rachel, I think it would be helpful to those in libraryland to get a sense of community and for those outside libraries to see how much work we are doing while we are not in the building. So, let’s do this!  Join us by sharing details of your day from Monday, April 20 through Friday, April 24, by using the hashtag LibrariesWFH on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, your blog, or anywhere you share content! 

Please, and I cannot stress this enough, do not compare yourself to others who are participating. Some of us are early risers, some are night-owls, some throw themselves into work when stressed, others stare at the screen for hours. Some of us are providing care for children and/or adults in our lives. Be human. Be kind.

 

References

Ahmad, A. S. (2020, March 27). Why You Should Ignore All That Coronavirus-Inspired Productivity Pressure. The Chronicle of Higher Education. https://www.chronicle.com/article/Why-You-Should-Ignore-All-That/248366

Gajendran, R. S., & Harrison, D. A. (2007). The good, the bad, and the unknown about telecommuting: Meta-analysis of psychological mediators and individual consequences. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92(6), 1524-1541. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0021-9010.92.6.1524

Henke, R. M., Benevent, R., Schulte, P., Rinehart, C., Crighton, K. A., & Corcoran, M. (2016). The Effects of Telecommuting Intensity on Employee Health. American Journal of Health Promotion, 30(8), 604–612. https://doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.141027-QUAN-544

Martin, N. (2020, March 17). Against Productivity in a Pandemic. The New Republic. https://newrepublic.com/article/156929/work-home-productivity-coronavirus-pandemic

Mautz, S. (2018, April 2). A 2-Year Stanford Study Shows the Astonishing Productivity Boost of Working From Home. Inc.Com. https://www.inc.com/scott-mautz/a-2-year-stanford-study-shows-astonishing-productivity-boost-of-working-from-home.html

O’Connell, B. (2020, March 31). Don’t Micromanage During the Coronavirus. SHRM. https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/people-managers/pages/coronavirus-micromanaging.aspx
Torres, M. (2020, March 19). No, You Don’t Have To Be Extra Productive During The Coronavirus Pandemic. HuffPost. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/coronavirus-productivity_l_5e712a89c5b6eab7793de6c7
Wingard, J. (2020, March 13). Leading Remote Workers: The Coronavirus’ Impact On Effective Management. Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonwingard/2020/03/13/team-working-at-home-because-of-coronavirus-heres-how-to-lead-them-effectively/