What IS a Library?

This week, after tweeting a link to ALA's President Molly Raphael's statement regarding the destruction of the Occupy Wall Street Library in New York City, I became engaged in a conversation on Twitter about what constitutes a library. To me this seems obvious, but I had a hard time coming up with a hard, fast definition. I discovered that, like Justice Stewart, I'm of the know-it-when-I-see-it mindset when it comes to identifying it - a library that is. I am not sure I can define it in terms that reconcile with the statement from ALA. If I say the dissolution or destruction of any library Read more [...]

Two New Library Podcasts You Should be Listening To: Circulating Ideas & Whatever Mathers

There are two new podcasts in libraryland you should be listening to! I know both of these hosts personally and I can't recommend their work enough so check them out! Circulating Ideas Circulating Ideas is a librarian interview podcast hosted by Steve Thomas. Steve has already had some great interviews and I know the line up he has for the rest of this year and next is going to be great. You can follow Circulating Ideas on Twitter @circideas, Facebook, the blog or subscribe via iTunes. Whatever Mathers Whatever Mathers features creative conversations with fabulous host Amy Mather and Read more [...]

Top Ten Links 2.44: eBooks, Digital Literacy, Transliteracy, Libraries & Quitting Google

My personally selected top ten from the links I shared on Twitter 10.30.2011 through 11.05.2011. In no particular order: 1. Free eBooks, Piracy & Secondhanding Musing on ebook piracy and free downloads yesterday at Alan Baxter’s blog, I made a passing comparison between the digital distribution of books, whether legally or illegally, and the sale of second-hand hardcopies. In both instances, neither author nor publisher makes money on the transaction, but whereas the former practice is almost invariably viewed as foolhardiness where legal and theft where not, the latter is viewed as Read more [...]

Why Amazon’s Lending Library is Not a Threat to Public Libraries

I had no idea that Amazon's announcement would signal the end of the world, or at least the end of public libraries, or as my friend & colleague Andy puts it, the library apocalypse or I would have included this in yesterday's post. First let's talk numbers about the Amazon Lending Library* Prime costs $79 a year, that's roughly $6.58 a month. You must have a Kindle (not an app) to use the Amazon Lending Library, those start at $79. There are 5,000 titles available, (here's a breakdown by genre) None of the six largest publishers in the U.S. is participating. You get one book Read more [...]

Amazon Announces Kindle Lending Library for Prime Members

If you have been paying attention you knew it was coming. The Kindle Lending Library from Amazon. If you own a Kindle, yes you have to have a device not an app, and a Prime Membership you can now borrow books from Amazon. More Info Kindles start at $79 Prime Membership is $79 a year. You can only borrow one book per calendar month. Right now there are about 5,000 titles. The book currently being borrowed can be read on multiple Kindles. devices, as long as they are registered to the same eligible account, but cannot be read on Kindle reading apps. One book can be borrowed Read more [...]

Blog Poll: What is the Most You Are Willing to Pay for an eBook? Why?

I thought I would run a little informal poll here on the blog - What's the most you'll pay for an ebook? For me that limit is $9.99 but its arbitrary, so I'm curious, what's your limit? If you feel like it, please leave a comment with your limit and why you chose that limit. Edited/Added for clarification: I'll pay more than $9.99 for textbooks. Even though I am grumpy that I can't sell them back at the end of the semester it is worth it not to have to deal with a heavy book that wont stay open and tiny print. Plus the highlighting options are super-freaking awesome! That said I do stick to Read more [...]

Top Ten Links 2.43: eBooks, Easy QR Codes, Time Management and Career Expectations

My personally selected top ten from the links I shared on Twitter 10.22.2011 through 10.28.2011. In no particular order: 1. Amazon adds Whispersync for personal ebooks · Hidden Peanuts Amazon is declaring that they don’t care where your ebook comes from, they just want you to read it on their platform (as long as it doesn’t have DRM mucking things up anyway). 2. great post! -> Amazon, Libraries and Ownership in the Digital Age | Guy LeCharles Gonzalez The ebooks being borrowed by Amazon customers aren’t the same ePUB files being licensed to libraries via Overdrive, they’re Amazon’s Read more [...]

How to Extend the Due Date of Your Library eBook on the Kindle

Just a friendly tip from your friendly online librarian. :-) It is pretty easy to "extend" the due date of the library ebook you check out to your kindle, just turn your wireless connection off until you're done with it. This will allow you to keep reading the book until you're done. The title won't expire until you reactivate your wireless connection. Can't remember to turn your wireless off or just don't want to keep it off all the time? Consider that handy email notice telling you that you have three days left that you get from Amazon (not your local library), you know the one that includes Read more [...]

eBook Link Round Up from Internet Librarian #il2011

During the two day ebook track in at Internet Librarian there were a lot of references to articles, reports and books, by myself, and others so I thought I would put together a link round up. Content by Cory Docotrow Seriously read this. It's free to download in the format of your choice and it will help you understand DRM better than anything else. E-book piracy may have unexpected benefits for publishers O'Leary makes the distinction between the instances of e-book piracy (the number of pirated e-book files available for download) and the impact of e-book piracy (the actual effect on Read more [...]