13 comments for “For Digital Natives There Is No Web 2.0

  1. March 1, 2010 at 7:56 pm

    Amazing or…not so much!! This 'label' makes sense only for us: the emigrants, don't you agree?

    • March 2, 2010 at 11:23 am

      yep I agree, it only makes sense for those who actually dealt with and remember 1.0.

  2. March 1, 2010 at 8:24 pm

    Because someone doesn't know what a term/phrase references it doesn't exist?

    The things passing for anecdata today simply amaze me.

  3. Strangedichotomy
    March 1, 2010 at 8:58 pm

    The natives don't reconize the terms but they know the services themselves. This shows a real and visible divide about what we obsess over, talk about,and over analyze. They don't give this “term/phrase” a second thought.

    It's innate to them, no term, just thought process almost like second nature. It gives rise to the point and ease of the younger transliterate audience.

    However, the issue with the younger audience is the print and pen. They are far more comfortable with a word processor than a pad and the opposite is true for most of their parents and so on.

    My major thought is how we can bridge this gap into a better understanding or methodology for both the immigrants and the natives without stressing these “terms”.

    • March 2, 2010 at 11:22 am

      agreed! and excellent points! we do need to bridge those gaps!

  4. Guest
    March 1, 2010 at 9:03 pm

    The natives don't reconize the terms but they know the services themselves. This shows a real and visible divide about what we obsess over, talk about,and over analyze. They don't give this “term/phrase” a second thought.

    It's innate to them, no term, just thought process almost like second nature. It gives rise to the point and ease of the younger transliterate audience.

    However, the issue with the younger audience is the print and pen. They are far more comfortable with a word processor than a pad and the opposite is true for most of their parents and so on.

    My major thought is how we can bridge this gap into a better understanding or methodology for both the immigrants and the natives without stressing these “terms”.

  5. March 1, 2010 at 9:46 pm

    While strangedichotomy is right that it's just that they don't know the terms, I think the real “lightbulb moment” here for us old folks is the extent to which these technologies are just a part of the environment for the younger audience. I couldn't tell you the difference between an alternator and a catalytic converter if you put one of each on a table in front of me, but I drive a car every day – same kind of thing. (Similarly, I've had undergrads at the reference desk look at me with total confusion when I said something about the “browser” – only to have the light dawn on them: “Oh, you mean the internet?”)

    The technology isn't what they see… what they see is what they DO with the technology. And that, to me, is a crucial thing for us old folks (who are managing the technology ;) ) to recognize.

    • March 2, 2010 at 11:22 am

      Anne I agree, its interesting to me because we (and I) spend so much time talking about 2.0 in many different ways, but for them its just the internet the way its always been.

  6. March 2, 2010 at 4:47 am

    After the first day of kindergarten, I was sent home with a note that read in total “William doesn't know or answer to his own name.” My mother sent a note back “That's because Andy has never heard it before.” I had always been called by my middle name, never my first name.

    This video reminds me of that. It's not that there isn't a Web 2.0, it's just that in the lives these kids have never heard anyone refer to it as anything but the internet.

    The takeaway for me is that we shouldn't get hung up on terms. Simple as that. It's the internet. Bam. Done. Good day, sir.

    • March 2, 2010 at 11:25 am

      it brings home to me that the 2.0 things we (Libraries) spend so much time talking about, deciding if they will use, what value they have, are already taken for granted by a significant portion of our patron base.

      • March 2, 2010 at 5:51 pm

        Very true. It's just trying to get previous generations online that eats up our time. Hmm. This is food for thought.

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