Internet Librarian Wrap Up

As always conferences are amazing, stimulating, intense and tiring, but worth every second of it. I was able to talk with so many amazing people, and yet there were so many others I wanted to connect with and didn’t manage to. *More reflection at the end, but for those who want the nitty gritty….

Pulled from notes and tweets – some of my favorite quotes/idea and what I’m thinking about.

  • If you could tell the world 1 thing about libraries in 30 secs or less what would it be?
  • Good enough is the new perfect
  • Lean into your discomfort – change doesn’t happen without discomfort.
  • Be clear where your lines are drawn.
  • Your librarianly obsession with Star Wars will not endear you to your patrons.
  • The future is here its just not evenly distributed.
  • Privacy is dead, get over it
  • “If I’d asked them what they wanted they would have said a faster horse” – Henry Ford
  • “If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.” Gen. Eric Shinseki
  • If we keep identifying with books – libraries are dead.
  • We should reward success and failure, punish inaction
  • We have more autonomy as college students that we do as adults
  • “I can’t understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I’m frightened of the old ones.” – John Cage
  • Assume everyone is going to be an ally
  • Understand what your org hidden org chart is
  • Ask for the sale
  • When people see something new they think you’re taking away the old, so start with what is staying the same
  • 70% of patron interaction occurs remotely.
  • Quest to Teen: Are you ever bullied online? Teen: Nope, I’m private, but sometimes my friends annoy me
  • 70% overlap btwn teens & boomers. Volunteer 4 xs more & engaged in the issues

Books I’ll be reading –

Jason Griffey created a wordle from the tweets, take a look at it full-sized it’s awesome.

Griffey's Wordle from IL 2009 Tweets

Griffey's Wordle from IL 2009 Tweets

*I was fortunate on my travels home, I did make it home with only minor delays (comparatively) and missing one bag which showed up 24 hours later, intact. I am grateful I was able to attend and extremely grateful for all the people who talked with me in hallway, coffee shop, sessions halls, exhibit halls, at dinner & coffee, and on the street. I wish we’d had more time to talk. I wish I’d had the nerve to approach more people I only know by name, I’m a little socially awkward. (Once I get to know you, you can’t shut me up) I vow to do better next time. Until then, ciao!

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7 comments for “Internet Librarian Wrap Up

  1. November 2, 2009 at 2:42 pm

    Great reflection!

    Do you remember where you heard this one? “If I’d asked them what they wanted they would have said a faster horse” – Henry Ford

    • November 2, 2009 at 3:13 pm

      Yes, Jason Griffey said it during the Dreaming, Designing, & Using Mobile Library Platforms session. He showed it on a slide I think. I’ve also heard him say it before. Its one of my favorite quotes

  2. November 2, 2009 at 4:45 pm

    Yep, that was part of my Future of Mobile talk. I love that quote for what it says about the advance of technologies….I’ll need to stop using it, though, if everyone’s already heard it. :-P

    • November 2, 2009 at 5:20 pm

      nah, “everyone” is a pretty small group if you think about it. Besides its a good one & we should be reminded of it regularly. I use it to encourage myself to try to think 3 or 4 steps ahead not just one

  3. Rowan Fairgrove
    November 4, 2009 at 12:22 pm

    Great round-up, the tweet cloud is cool. I thought twitter was an amazing way to track the con, unlike our attempt at a google wave which fizzled. Sorry we didn’t get a chance to gab.

  4. Eliska
    December 14, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    I’d like to use the Ford faster horse quote in a paper but I’d like to properly cite it in APA form. Any clue as to the original origin? I’ve searched and searched and can find it commonly attributed to him with no source information. As a librarian, I thought you could help… can you?

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